This Is Elle releases her debut song ‘Killing My Love’

Powerful, soulful vocalists don’t come around every day, and Italian singer/songwriter Laura Pizzicannella is one of them. Her debut single “Killing My Love” set for release on Jan. 17, 2020, showcases her soaring vocals which are reminiscent of both Florence Welch (of Florence and the Machine) and Adele. “Killing My Love” is a love song about a relationship that has ended and how you try to kill any feelings for the other person that are left in your heart. It’s a very strong, heartfelt and melancholy track written and produced by Flavio and Claudio Zampa. As a founding member of

Gemtarra – “Fire Me Up” captures a sense of urgency and energy

Formed twin sisters Gina and Tina Ciera in 2018, Gemtarra is a Philadelphia based band who get its name from the Italian words Gemelli (which means twins) and Chitarra ( which means guitar). The band who recorded their EP “Fired Up” with Grammy award-winning Producer/Engineer Phil Nicolo, is made up of Gina and Tina Cieri (songwriting and guitars), Bryan Feddish (bass), Sunny Dee (drums), Megan Glaubitz (lead singer) and Tawana Simons (percussion). Their latest single “Fire Me Up” is lifted from the aforementioned EP. There is a lot to appreciate about Gemtarra. Their music has a driving beat, with harmonized

Darshae Kiér – “Halasana Girl” is geared towards turntable dominance

Despite a rough start in life, being shuffled from foster home to foster home, Miami, FL based artist Darshae Kiér, has always moved ahead in life with positive conviction and determination. He has created his sound and steadily built up a fanbase mixing pop, dance and reggaeton flavors into his music. Throughout his latest track – “Halasana Girl”, Darshae’s sensitive but street-savvy personality is on display. He returns reggaeton music to its island roots and takes the listener along for the ride. This is Darshae Kiér vibrant getaway into what more the Latin music movement has to offer to Pop

Kidricc James – “Gravy” – The gravity in the words is matched by the sound of the production!

Texas-based rapper, Kidricc James drops his dynamic new single “Gravy”. The track which has been peaking on Digital Radio Tracker’s Global Top 150 Independent Airplay Chart, is also supported by an engaging video shot in Houston. If I had to give a quick intro into this track, it would be: Great emotional depth in storytelling. Engaging beat. Thoroughly satisfying rap skills. More than just multisyllabic rhymes. Relatable and relevant. I think Kidricc James accomplished his intents with this track. “Gravy”really revolves around him in a much more different way than his prior works. It’s his vision in a much fuller

Buss – ‘ELEMENT OF SURPRISE’ sounds like a mission statement

An artist and songwriter, Buss is also the CEO, owner and founder of the label Fatal Thoughts. They have signed a handful of artists, including standout performer Hype Bigga his good friend, and lil brother, and then his twin sons, Johnboy and Jaredteez. ‘ELEMENT OF SURPRISE’ is Buss’ latest EP release.  He also has two mixtapes out, called ‘The Takeover’ and ‘The Takeover Pt2’. ‘The Takeover Pt3’ is set to drop on Jan 31st. In typical hit fashion, this EP release is packed heavily with quality samples from epic tracks, to give each song a nostalgic flavor that will have

Irish Indie Pop Duo – Yes We See

Yes We See is a young Irish band from Roscommon, Ireland made up of Liam Kilcline (lead singer) and Shane Finneran (lead guitarist). Childhood friends, they have been writing music together for over 15 years. Having spent the last 3 years living in Vietnam they have worked hard to create their sound and began building on all the original music they have created over the years. The duo describe their music genre as Indie Pop. Yes We See take inspiration from a range of genres and artists, from Catfish and the Bottlemen, to Two Door Cinema Club and Hozier who

Ervin Mitchell drops the official music video for ‘Break The Internet’

Emerging rap star Ervin Mitchell reminds us to “count our blessings every day” in the official music video to ‘Break The Internet’. On the track, Ervin Mitchell proves that he is a master at his craft of writing. I also love his style when it comes to his vocal and rapping abilities. His sound is different, laidback, almost melancholic in a way. The track is a beautiful character study that will make you consider the importance of social media, the problem of money, and the meaning of life in general. In a world full of meaningless music, it’s always great

INTERVIEW: Malcolm.E – A Hip Hop Artist, Sound Engineer and Producer, from Swaziland

Malcolm.E is a 22 year old Hip Hop artist, Sound Engineer and Producer, from Eswatini (Swaziland). He found his love for rap music during his early high school years and in his last year of high school decided he wanted to create music for a living. Since then he has been releasing music consistently and growing his fan base. In 2018 Malcolm.E graduated from the Cape Audio College in Cape Town, South Africa, with a 3 year Diploma in Sound Technology and Production. He now uses his skills in his everyday life of making music. He dropped his second project

Tatono – “Far” – at the forefront of travel-induced electronic music!

Tatono’s travel-inspired music is created while he explores the world, and which he incorporates into his own filming for breathtaking self-composed videos. Tatono’s music has been featured across many travel shows and on highly acclaimed YouTube channels. The Bend, Oregon-based artist began musical his journey at the young age of 17, when he played drums in high school garage bands. The artist, who has been inspired by the likes of Moby and Thievery Corporation has just released his 2020 album “Far”, which he says sums up his year of 2019. Some songs on the album were made for collaboration projects

Warchief Rasco – “Good Ones Go To Soon” continues his atmospheric Hip-hop fusion sound!

“Good Ones Go To Soon” is an oath for the real ones I’ve lost in my life from either drugs, violence, or suicide to keep going hard and following the dream while spreading love all at the same time,” says Warchief Rasco. Rasco has a gift for writing concise, infectious earworms. When a track such as “Good Ones Go To Soon” arrives at its conclusion, it leaves a void in the listener that can only be filled by playing the track again and again. The cut has a quality backing instrumental, complete with a reverbed staccato guitar riff and a

Therina Bella: Indie Rock’s Dark Lady

We take a look at what makes the talented alternative and gothic rock, singer songwriter Therina Bella, tick. The interview was conducted by Jamsphere’s Rick Jamm. Therina also won Jamsphere’s 2012 “Song Of  The Year Award”.

1. How long have you been doing what you’re doing and how did you get started in the first place?

THERINA:   I probably began singing in utero. As a child I was very musical and interested in musical instruments and performing. I began taking piano lessons when I was nine from a conservatory trained teacher who seemed like she’d break your knuckles if you made a mistake. As a result I was highly motivated to practice.

2. Who has been, or are, your musical influences?

THERINA: I think the first time I ever heard Queen’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’, I knew I wanted to write music. I used to study Freddie Mercury’s singing and tried to emulate him. So Queen are a huge influence of mine. I also love David Bowie, Nine Inch Nails, Muse, PJ Harvey, Tori Amos… I could go on and on.

3. Put together your dream jam session band made up of your all time favourite musicians.

THERINA: I’d just like to have an entire record produced by Trent Reznor. That would be my dream. I wouldn’t mind Matt Bellamy of Muse coming by to lay down some guitar on it either. If we can resurrect the dead, I’d love to bring back Freddie Mercury to sing with me and lay down some piano.

4. Describe your first instrument or piece of musical equipment.

THERINA: My parent’s bought an old upright piano from the 1930’s for me when I was nine. I still play the very same piano. I also played xylophone in my elementary school band. 

5. What CD is in your car stereo right now?

THERINA: PJ Harvey’s Let England Shake, but honestly I listen to my I-Pod on Shuffle a lot more than CD’s these days. 

6. Which song or musical composition do you wish you had created and why?

THERINA: This is so difficult to answer because there are so many gorgeous songs out there that make me want to cry and this answer changes from day to day depending on my mood…

7. The greatest album ever, and why?

THERINA: I can’t narrow it down to one but here are four of my favourites: Nine Inch Nails- The Downward Spiral because it was the album I used to listen to while I was a sullen pre-teen and teen. Queen- A Night At The Opera because it contains, “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “The Prophet’s Song” two of the coolest Queen songs ever recorded. Muse- Absolution because there are so many beautiful songs and arrangements on it. Fiona Apple- When The Pawn… because she writes some of the greatest lyrics in the universe.

8. If you were forced to pick one, which of your original compositions is your favourite?

THERINA: My songs, Starcrossed, Forever and Ether are among my favourites. I’m a very prolific writer so I’m sure I’ll probably compose my next favourite song tomorrow or the next day.

9. Which ingredient do you think is most essential in making your music the way it is?

THERINA: Rainbow Sprinkles. 

10. Does the place where you live ( or places you have lived ) affect the music you create and in what ways?

THERINA: I live in NYC and sometimes the winters are brutal. I mostly stay indoors for three months, get seasonal affective disorder and wind up composing sad songs about death and the apocalypse. If I lived in a tropical place, I’d probably be writing happy commercial pop songs about love and puppies. 

11. What aspect of music making excites you most?

THERINA: I love the creative aspect of making music. I love composing music and writing lyrics and then recording and arranging that song so it’s immortalized forever. I do enjoy performing live as well, but I prefer the permanence of recorded music. Since death and mortality are a recurring, underlying theme of the songs I write, I like the idea that my recorded music will out live me.

12. What aspect of music making discourages you most?

THERINA: It’s financially difficult to make music. It’s very expensive to record in a studio and produce quality material. Once you’ve saved up enough cash and can record your music and you have a CD to sell or downloads to sell, we live in an age where NO ONE actually wants to buy the music. People expect to get music for free. Which leaves most musicians in this awful paradox of not knowing how the hell to keep making music without going into tremendous debt and surviving only on ramen noodles.

13. What are your thoughts about the actual state of the music industry today?

THERINA: Most musicians I know are no longer looking to get a “record deal”. Record deals are obsolete unless you are creating corporate disposable pop music. If you want to make interesting music or art, you are better off releasing it yourself. The internet has done amazing things for independent artists, allowing them to release their music and be potentially exposed to thousands of people they would have never been able to reach otherwise. The downside to all this technology is that people expect to get music for free. A lot of artist’s are relying on fan funding to record and release music, but I’m not sure if that is a way you can actually pay your rent… The state of the music industry is a scary one at this time. I’m not sure if there will be much of an industry left in a few years. We’ll only have the Katy Perry’s and Lady Gaga’s left in the major label world. And all indie artists will be trying to forge their own path sans record deal.

14. The best piece of advice in this business you actually followed (and one you didn’t but should have)?

THERINA: My dad always told me to trust my instincts and to go with my gut, so that’s what I do when I need to make a music business related decision. One piece of advice I got and SHOULD have followed was given to me by my management team just as I was offered a major label deal when I was only 18 years old, “Just do what the label wants. Release the music they want you to release even though it’s pop. Once you become famous and go to make your second record, you can do whatever you want.”

I turned that $250,000 deal down, because they wanted me to be something I’m not.  I wanted to be dark and create artistic records. I wanted to be like PJ Harvey, not Britney Spears. Nowadays, after struggling so long going the Indie route, I’ll take the tube top and head piece microphone and lip sync with a smile. So remember kids, if the opportunity ever comes to you to sell out…. TAKE IT!! 

15. At this time in your career, as an independent artist, which factor do you desire most (increased music distribution, better quality production, more media exposure etc…) and why?

THERINA: More media exposure hands down! It means nothing to have a well recorded, well distributed record out if no one has ever heard of you. 

16. How often and for how long do actually practise or exercise your talent

THERINA: I’m a very serious vocalist and I train my voice daily for at least 20 minutes a day. On an average day I spend about 3-5 hours playing guitar, piano, singing, composing and recording. 

17. Which is your favourite distribution platform ( Tunecore, Audiolife, CD Baby, your own Website, etc…) and why?

THERINA: I think the one I personally use the most to find music is I-Tunes. I know a lot of electronic distro companies offer I-Tunes to their clients.

18. Live gigging or studio recording, pick your first choice and why?

THERINA: I prefer studio recording.  I’ve never played a live show where I thought the sound or venue was amazing. I’ve always had some technical difficulties occur or an awful sound person controlling the board. I love recording in the studio. It’s so much fun and I love being in complete control of how everything sounds and arranging and mixing a song the way I envision it my mind. It’s one of the best parts of being a composer.

19. Analogue or Digital effects in music production. Choose one and tell us why?

THERINA: I really love analogue effects. I especially love analogue synthesizers and how the same sound is very difficult to reproduce again. I love analogue delay and lots of different analogue guitar pedals. However- I also love the digital aspect of recording music. It’s much less time consuming which means it costs less and you are able to produce a record in a short amount of time. 

20. If you were not a musician, what would you be doing today?

THERINA: I’d be a trainer in a Russian Cat Circus or a Unicorn Breeder.

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