Cris Marshall’s music will ensure he hooks as wide an audience as possible

Cris Marshall is an American Country Music Artist raised in a musical home, the small town of Haslet, Texas. He received his first drum set from his father at the age of two and by 8 he was playing his first guitar. In his teens, and alongside his dad, Cris began performing at some of Dallas/Fort Worth’s most well-known music venues. A singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer, Cris also launched his very own home studio when he was 18, recording artists and bands all over Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. However his passion for writing and performing never subsided during this time,

Midnight Watchman: “Liquid Universe” – an extremely focused record

A guitarist and keyboard player who began as a street musician in UK before touring the US and then returning home, Andy Jones AKA Midnight Watchman, is a composer and producer of ambient music. Influenced by an extremely wide spectrum of music and musicians, that go from Vangelis to Chopin, ad Ryan Adams to Tycho, Midnight Watchman has released his 12 track instrumental album, entitled “Liquid Universe”. In the hands of a lesser artist, the varying song structures of this album would likely become tiresome, but every one of the album’s twelve tracks is a testament to the Midnight Watchman’s

Joey Britton: “Edmonton Sessions” – fluorescent, acoustic-centric ambient atmospheres

Joey Britton started his journey in music at an early age. He joined the band ISO and played lead guitar helping to launch the Torn and Tethered Album. After ISO, Joey decided to move to California to expand his skills in the music industry while writing, recording, and producing his own records.  “I try to write songs that tell stories, relate to people, so that when you listen to them – you realize you’re not alone,” says Joey Britton. Exploring is an experience not easily replicated. Associated with it is equal parts thrill, anxiety, and apprehension. Exploring a new artist

Daryl Yahudy: “Soulful Life Within” – a perfect calling card

Indeed, you could say that Darrell McClover aka Daryl Yahudy, a former professional athlete, is a soul singer with a warm timbre and a penchant for sublime, emotional arrangements, defining what the neo-soul genre should sound like in 2017. He is a singer with a fine voice weaving a spell on songs which are full of distinctive takes on universal topics. The album “Soulful Life Within” is almost looking at how he was, how he is and how he will be in life. The warm, evocative, impeccable playing around Daryl here ensures a timeless listen. The album is overflowing with lush, lilting

John J: “Pain To Power 5 Love Letters” – strap yourself in and enjoy this vibrantly orchestrated roller coaster

I have always been eager to pick up every piece of music John J issues because of the lyrical expertise he demonstrates in every song, and the attention to the music production and features he provides. John J has just dropped a 5 track bonus EP, entitled “Pain To Power 5 Love Letters”, which comes hot on the heels of his latest release, “Pain To Power”. Like his previous recordings, each song on this EP carries a different succinct feel and hook while the flow stays swift and acrobatic. The beats, features and subject matter again excel well above average.

Chaz Hearne: “Rise of the Voluminous” – sneakily inventive and massively engaging

The very first thing I learned while listening to the album “Rise of the Voluminous” by eclectic folk artist, Chaz Hearne, is that the defining question regarding any Hearne song is which Chaz Hearne he’ll be. Will it be the introspective, contemplative Hearne of slow-burning masterpieces like “Falling For Reason” and “Hount The Jab”? Or will the party-starter behind “Fun In ‘82” poke his head out, armed with flash phrases and funky beats? Or maybe he will just activate his progressive art-rock mode, as on “Voluminous Man” and “Spicy In The Dim Halls” – catchy, complex, yet ultimately armed with a sort

The Gibb Collective: “Please Don’t Turn Out the Lights” – perfectly cut gems!

October marks the 45th anniversary of the Bee Gees song “Please Don’t Turn Out the Lights,” and fans of the musical super group of the 1970s, have reason to be excited. The Gibb Collective is a musical tribute, and a family legacy.  On the input of Maurice’s daughter, Samantha, the children of Andy, Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb have found a way to honor their fathers by infusing new lymph  into the more than memorable Bee Gee classics of the 60’s and 70’s. And what better title for the 10-track album, than “Please Don’t Turn Out The Lights”. Though I

John-Marc Lucid: “Judas” ft. Fyah Sthar – breathes down-to-earth authenticity

Music is a very powerful and mystical force. It speaks to people on a much deeper level than conversation. It really reaches the soul. With his new track “Judas” ft. Fyah Sthar, John-Marc Lucid hits us with music that indeed does reach our souls, an intriguing melody, piercing lyrics and outstanding musicianship included. The new release by the Texas based Dancehall and Reggae artist is a joint venture with Fyah Sthar, and together they breathe down-to-earth authenticity, making for an airy, buoyant listening experience. Lucid is a creative mind that doesn’t bother about drawers or labels – his music explores

Innocent Bystanders: “Attractive Nuisance” – a roller coaster of emotion and excitement

Based in Kensington and Mission Hills, Innocent Bystanders was founded by musicians who played regularly in various bands in high school and college, who got together to form a band to play fundraising events for a local law school. They perform a wide-range of rock and soul, focused on the music of the 1960s and 1970s. The band is made up of Steve Berenson (Drums), Steve Semeraro (Electric Guitar, Vocals), Kaimi Wenger (Keyboards, Vocals), Jessica LaFave (Saxophone), Ben Nieberg (Acoustic Guitar, Vocals) Kath Rogers (Vocals) and Donny Samporna (Bass guitar). Their “Attractive Nuisance” EP of original music was recorded at

Roger Cole & Paul Barrere: “Let It Go” combines musical inspiration and travelling emotions

Meaningful lyrics, amazing songwriting, superb heart-warming yet angry sound, musical teamwork, everything is so perfect in this track. Such a gorgeous and refined melody and philosophical lyrics is worth being remembered for all of the current generation. The guitarist uses swampy resonating sound so beautifully and the drummer plays simple but tight groove, with every drum fill-in is on the sweet musical spots. The bassist backs up the music stably as the boys sing the vocals with conviction. This is one of my current desert Island #1’s in the Roger Cole & Paul Barrere catalog. Yes, the track “Let It

The Stillwinter: “The Beauty Within” – you can feel the band’s energy as if you were listening to them live!

The Stillwinter is a four-piece punk-pop and rock band out of Redlands, California. Founded in late 2011 by front-man Kelly Tittor and guitarist Cameron Terry, the band currently consists of members Ian Kelly (vocals), Tim Bristol (guitar), Richie Koepsell (bass), Alfonso Guzman (drums). Some of The Stillwinter’s more notable shows include playing at House of Blues in Downtown Disney, opening for world famous, rock veterans Rufio, Eve 6, Unwritten Law, Voodoo Glow Skulls, Reel Big Fish, Adema and having their music aired on multiple college radios including X103.9 FM as well as having played live in the world famous Warped Tour 2013.

The Stillwinter

The Stillwinter

The Stillwinter has recently released their 11-track album, “The Beauty Within”. In a time when music is being overproduced and trying to have the best radio-ready songs mass-produced to millions of teens there’s a breath of fresh air. The Stillwinter is too hard to categorize into just a single category as they write and preform from their hearts. Some songs are super punk, some songs are emo or alternative-rock-influenced, and others are catchy pop-punk songs. Yet all the tracks have the same thing in common, they all show through raw emotions to a larger picture. These Redlands guys seem to have more on their mind then just blonde girls and pimped-out cars. This is what sets them apart from the other punk contenders, and together with those who are also musically and lyrically gifted like Blink-182, My Chemical Romance, New Found Glory, Simple Plan or Fall Out Boy.

Also, with listening to “The Beauty Within” you can feel the band’s energy as if you were listening to them live. They make enough sound-waves to lift your spirits even on the cloudiest of days; the melodies are great, the guitar riffs sound raw and catchy at the same time, the basslines are solid and you can actually hear them, while the drum work and vocals are superb.

The album artwork

The album artwork

The Stillwinter’s winning combination of strong melodies, smart and exciting keyboard arrangements, and breathtaking guitar riffs, twist and turn though standout, high energy tracks like “The Undefeated”, “The Reaping”, “Filthy Needs”, “Lucid Dream Girl”, “One Night One Stand” and “Six Feet Under”. But the band show that they can also slow it down on the soaring power ballad “Volume 6” or deliver rip-roaring pop catchiness with “Lost in Sanity”. All round “The Beauty Within” proves beyond doubt that this band has some real talent, very original music with skillful performances, and vocals that can do incredible things.

For those of you who are not slaves to genre labels you might want to try this album. It is strong musically as well as lyrically. When I first heard about The Stillwinter I didn’t expect to like them. “Just another punk band”, I thought, however, this album really impressed me. This band is extremely different from the norm. They bring something new to the table, mainly, originality. Their lyrics are intriguing, metaphoric, and at times ironic. The songs are fast, loud, and brilliant, showcasing excellent musicality. The Stillwinter has managed to blend genres to create a great punk-pop-rock sound. From top to bottom, “The Beauty Within” is a five-star album!

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