Midwest Hiphop duo Strangers Of Necessity drop their new single “Abundance”

Strangers Of Necessity are an American hip-hop duo, based in the Midwest, consisting of prolific producer, CoryaYo and veteran lyricist, Fooch the MC. They linked via Twitter and quickly became friends, sparking an immediate chemistry and need to make quality music together; hence the name Strangers Of Necessity. They instantly began recording music and doing shows locally, generating a nice buzz in the area. Their sound is best described as a fresh take on that golden era of hip-hop, blending tasteful jazz and soul samples, crisp snares, boomy kicks on wonky patterns with a soulful delivery, dense schemes and potent

Kilo M.O.E. – ‘Fly G’z and Palm Treez’ – serves as the perfect canvas for the rapper’s elite lyricism

The Baltimore-based producer, songwriter, rapper, Kilo M.O.E.’s evolution over his past three albums has been inspiring to see. I’ll always admire artists who push themselves creatively, and that’s exactly what, Kilo M.O.E. has done on his fourth studio album, ‘Fly G’z and Palm Treez’, and it pays off in leaps and bounds. Each instrumental is rich and developed, serving as the perfect canvas for the rapper’s elite lyricism. Something that this recording and Kilo M.O.E.’s recent albums have done well is allow him the freedom to rap for the sake of his craft within the confines of the album’s larger

Jim Wyly – “You Took Me” – It’s rhythmically tight, warm and edgy

Texas singer songwriter Jim Wyly is back with another soul-stirring track from his “The Artisan” album. Over 40 years deep into his craft, the Austin troubadour sounds like a home-cooked meal. He deals out comfort food for the head, heart, and soul. All of this serves his finely drawn guitar lines, bourbon-stained-like vocals, and funky acoustic-driven grooves as thick as molasses. A subtle blend of blues, country, folk and southern rock runs right down the middle of “You Took Me”. “Musicians’ musician” is an overused term. Why wouldn’t anyone with two good ears appreciate Jim Wyly? As Jim doesn’t cater

Hanen Release Brand New Video For The Song “Breathe”

It’s never been easier for artists to stay independent. Of course you can get good music producers, good visual directors for videos, good rappers and good singers to feature on your track without a great budget, but you have to search the world over to find deals you can afford, or convince creatives to work with you. Texas born artist, now living in the LA area, Hanen, somehow got it all together on his latest track called “Breathe”. He sings soulfully and raps with an urban edge all by himself, backed by an atmospheric slow-burning, and ear-warming beat made by

Angry B – “Hey Corona! (Nice to Meet Ya)” – reflects the realities with a good dose of wit

On his latest single, “Hey Corona! (Nice to Meet Ya)”, underground music hobbyist Angry B pinned his rap skills and dark wit, to the sounds of mainstream pop and a funky EDM template. He blurs the lines between genres with the top of the charts — and only the top — in his sights. As can be deciphered from the song title, Angry B pulls his aspirations from the dramatic Covid-19 disease hitting mankind across the globe. “It’s one of the most critical situations we’ve had and there will be a lot of sad stories connected with it,” says Angry

Izzie’s Caravan – “Leo’s Guitar EP” – an understated guitar virtuoso

On the recording, “Leo’s Guitar EP”, Izzie’s Caravan and his guitar conspire to use every single crayon within the blue color box to deliver one of the best underground independent studio blues releases I’ve heard this year. Among others, Izzie takes his cue from greats such as Lightnin’ Hopkins, Buddy Guy, John Lee Hooker, and Eric Clapton. So you can expect a wide and wholesome finger bending spectrum of sounds. The aforementioned guitar heroes are points of reference, not simple deductions for resemblance. The opening song, “Two’s In The Bush”, has a highway drive, and jangly timbre that’s upbeat and

‘Mind Blown’ – The Video and Brand New Single by EyeKonic

EyeKonik is an artist with a focus on creating punchy and appealing pop music with a personal twist. Recently, he released a brand new single called ‘Mind Blown’. What really makes this track stands out is definitely the fact that it’s so well produced, and the performance value is excellent as well. EyeKonik sings with passion and intensity, and the artist’s vocals soar through the atmospheric melodies and punchy tones of this mix. Fans of artists as diverse as Mac Miller, Michael Jackson, Prince, and Eminem are definitely going to enjoy this amazing single. Check out the newly released music

Sundance Jump with W. Dire Wolff release the Indie Rock Video “Zodiac Killer”

Zodiac Killer is a wild Indie Rock song with crazy slide guitar laid over a rockabilly beat. The song is about a woman who frequents a night club called Zodiacs by nights, and cruises around town by day. Deep Purple Sage is a CD, Vinyl, and Digital release by Sundance Jump with W. Dire Wolff. The album blends Alternative Rock with Psychedelic Acid Rock. Recorded in Joshua Tree, California at Skylab Studios; the album has an underlying desert theme.  The LP is recorded in the old school style of Acid Rock vintage tube amp guitar sounds, mixed through analog

THE BRKN DEBUT EP ‘NO. 3’ OUT NOW VIA INGROOVES

FRONTMAN JACOB CADE’S ‘ACOUSTIC HANG WITH JACOB FROM THE BRKN’ WILL LIVE STREAM VIA THE BANDS INSTAGRAM AND FACEBOOK THROUGH THE END OF APRIL AT 6PM PST/7PM MST/9PM EST THE BRKN recently released their debut EP No. 3 via Right Brain Music Group/Ingrooves. Their new video for their song “Broke” has garnered over 100 views in just two weeks. Since the band’s spring tours have been cancelled due to the Coronavirus, frontman Jacob Cade will be live streaming acoustic sessions every Tuesday through April via the band’s Facebook and Instagram. Tune in at 6PM PST/7PM MST/9PM EST at https://instagram.com/thebrkn or https://facebook.com/thebrkn and #BeatTheVirusWithTheBRKN. “We’re

D-Witt flexes the pen of a budding cinematic storyteller

I recently heard about an artist called D-Witt from Rockford, IL.  Illinois is the home of some prestigious sons who have left unforgettable marks on hip-hop’s history. I’m expecting an unfiltered rebel who is unafraid to bare his soul and burn down buildings. A fearless heart is a quality that makes fearless art, and I hope that’s exactly what D-Witt has arrived to present us.  So I press play on the first track called “Enemy”. The sound is open and strong-willed. There’s no doubting that D-Witt has something to say. The amount of care that goes into his lyricism stamps

Interview with Trap and Dubstep artist – Basslager

Basslager is a young electronic music producer based in St. Louis, Missouri who specializes in creating intricate tracks with an emphasis on timbral, rhythmic, and melodic complexity. Basslager has been a student of music for many years. Cello was his first foray into the realm of music, which he began at the age of three. Initially, the only way to inspire him to practice was the promise of getting rich. A deal was struck between him and his parents, and at the price of 1¢ per song practiced, Basslager quickly decided to diversify (as any savvy business person would do), taking up the piano and later the guitar. Recently, Basslager has primarily produced in the genres of trap and dubstep, while incorporating elements from neurohop, classical music, and heavy metal. In an exclusive interview Basslager filled in the blank spots for us.

  1. How did you get started in the music business and where did you get the name Basslager from?

Basslager: I began playing music when I was three years old, when I learned the cello. I later learned the piano and the guitar before finally taking up music production in early 2013. I had my first commercial release later that year through a small indepedant label.

While I wish the name “Basslager” had a more profound meaning, I chose it mainly because I like both fish and beer, and I enjoyed the double entendre that “bass” provided. Although I include a lot of fish imagery in my artwork, “bass” is supposed to be pronounced   like the subsonic frequencies, not the fish.

  1. Who were your first musical influences that you can remember?

Basslager: When I was growing up learning piano and cello, I mainly listened to classical music, particularly from the baroque period. Later, when I discovered other genres I almost entirely stopped listening to classical music, however, classical music elements can still be heard in many of my tracks. When I create music I typically like to include evolving or multilayered call and response melodies that are often heard in many classical songs.

  1. Which artists are you currently listening to? And is there anyone of these that you’d like to collaborate with?

Basslager: I listen to a lot Apashe and the other artists out of Kannibalen Records in addition to lots of IDM. I recently discovered a neat album (Diametry) by Fidelium that really captured my attention. I’d be super keen to make something with him.

  1. How and when did the move from Cello, Guitar and Piano to electronic music come about?

Basslager: It was by no means an intentional progression to electronic music. My first experience with producing music came from trying to record some of my guitar/cello/piano arrangements in Garage Band. Electronic music production came as an off shoot of that. I began making songs almost entirely within my DAW in early 2013.

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  1. Essentially how do you currently produce your sound? Is it loops, samples and software based and do you also use real live instruments in your productions?

Basslager: While I create my basses and synths within software such as Massive, Reaktor, or Alchemy, almost everything else that I include in my tracks is some version of a real life sample. I run the sample through a variety of effects and processes until it I like how it sounds. I have used live instruments in the past, however now I mostly sample live instruments and then use samplers, as it lets me edit out my mistakes.

  1. Which do you ultimately prefer? Entertaining a live audience or creating songs in a studio setting?

Basslager: I definitely prefer producing in the studio. Performing live is a ton of fun, especially if everything is going just right, but especially for a DJ, I don’t feel like it allows you the same level of creativity that you get to have when making something from scratch.

  1. What do you do in your time outside of making music? Do you have any other hobbies?

Basslager: My primary time sink besides producing music is definitely school. I’m attending Washington University where I study computer science and marketing. In addition to that I play on the rugby team. While not completely separate from music production, I own and operate the electronic music production blog http://producerheadquarters.com

     8. What does your current studio setup consist of?

Basslager: In addition to my computer and DAW (Logic 9), I have a midi keyboard, drum pad, hardware mixer, and several microphones. I use Native Instruments Komplete 10 and Camel Audio’s alchemy to do most of my sound design.

  1. Which piece of hardware or software would you consider the most essential in your Production setup, and that you would never want to be without?

Basslager: Definitely my computer. While I can get by not having my studio set up when I am on the road, without my computer I cannot produce anything. Earlier this year my computer had a complete meltdown and I was a fish out of water for several weeks before I got it replaced.

  1. What is the title of your latest release and where can fans find it?

Basslager: I have an upcoming EP, entitled “I Can’t Breathe” which is going to be available through TRNT Records. I try to keep my Soundcloud up to date with new, free downloads and mixes several times a month.

  1. Which aspect of being an independent artist and the music making process excites you most and which aspect discourages you most?

Basslager: For me it’s basically the same answer for both questions: people hearing my music. Nothing gives me a better feeling when someone (whom I have no real connection with otherwise) tells me that they like what I am doing and to keep up the good work. That being said, sometimes it feels like there is no one out there hearing what you’re doing which can be discouraging.

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  1. How do you market and manage your music career? Do you have a management team or do you control everything by yourself?

Basslager: I handle everything myself. I like the experience that I get from doing so. Currently I am in university right now studying marketing and computer science, and the experience with online marketing, web design and social media promotion that I have gotten through managing my music project has opened up a lot of doors for me.

  1. Do you work exclusively a private home recording environment or do you use a commercial sound studio too? For example, do you outsource your mixing and mastering?

Basslager:  For the most part I do all steps of the process myself, although when I have a commercial release I let the label take care of the mastering process. I don’t have the studio equipment or room set up to do a truly professional master on my tracks.

  1. The best piece of advice in this business you actually followed so far, and one you didn’t follow, but now know for sure that you should have?

Basslager: I can’t remember where I heard it, but I read somewhere that having one real fan is far better than a thousand “followers” who are unengaged. I think that is especially true for social media. I wish I had followed that advice earlier on. For a long time I figured if I made good stuff eventually people would find it and listen. The unfortunate truth is there far more good musicians out there than will ever be heard.

  1. Gives us your personal shortlist of the best 3 electronic producers currently in circulation – underground or mainstream?

Basslager: Skrillex will always be one of my favorite electronic music icons. Essentially everyone with the least bit of familiarity with the scene knows who he is, and what his sound is. While it is a fairly popular to give him hate, I think he is doing great things with OWSLA and Nest HQ (his free release label). I have found so many great artists who have released under both.

Apashe is another one of my favorites. He has some of the best sound design around, and couples his amazing sound design with excellent orchestral or other real life instrument samples. It’s not often that he releases a track that I don’t immediately download.

Otto Van Schirach is a live performance master. His music is esoteric, and far from mainstream, but the way he performs it captivates the audience. I strongly suggest you watch his boiler room set. It is one of the strangest, most entertaining hours to be found anywhere on Youtube.

  1. Do you consider Internet and all the social media websites, as fundamental to your career, and independent music in general, or do you think it has only produced a mass of mediocre “copy-and-paste” artists, who flood the web?

Basslager: I personally dislike social media, but that is mainly because I have trouble keeping up with it all. I think it’s a great way to keep in contact with your fan base, but I personally have trouble finding time to do so adequately. I think social media has definitely made it easier to “fake it” now than it had been in the past.

As a response to social media I have started developing my own website (basslager.com) in an effort to give myself an online hub that is detached from the social media realm. Its still in its infancy so I am not sure how it will actually turn out.

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  1. If someone has never heard your music, which keywords would you personally use to describe your overall sound and style?

Basslager: Personally I feel that my style falls under the umbrella of Trap/Dubstep. Within that umbrella I would say that a lot of my songs are fairly IDM influenced, with a strong focus on melody, rhythmic variation, while also retaining danceability. That being said, I will occasionally release a track that is more mainstream sounding in an effort to help promote the stuff that I like making.

  1. Straight off the top of your head, how would you describe the current state of electronic music in general?

Basslager: Its obvious that the entire genre is growing… fast. Although I wasn’t around at the time, I have a feeling that electronic music now looks very similar to how rock did thirty or forty years ago. A lot of people say that electronic music is getting “too mainstream”. I would argue there has always been a mainstream and an underground in every genre, regardless of how big or small. While the mainstream of electronic music is growing a lot, so is the underground. I’m finding more, better, unheard of artists now in 2015 than I did just two years ago.

  1. As you work your way through your career, which more than any other fires-up your imagination – A Grammy award, Platinum music sales or some other tangible milestone?

Basslager: I guess the pinnacle of (realistic) success for me would be underground recognition. I would be thrilled to have a sizeable dedicated fan base that come to my shows because they like what I have to perform for them. It would great to have that on a massive scale, kind of like what Pretty Lights has, but right now achieving St. Louis recognition is what motivates me.

  1. What is the ONE thing you are NOT willing or prepared to do EVER, in your quest to achieve a successful musical career?

Basslager: I hope that no matter what type of success comes my way, I will always stay humble. As of right now, I try to communicate directly with fans, answering questions, responding to comments and what not. Even if my fan base explodes, and I achieve absurd mainstream success, I want people who listen to my music to see themselves as my friends and not just followers of some untouchable icon. Luck shouldn’t dictate how I treat other people.

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